Illinois
Financial Assistance Policy
Illinois requires both nonprofit and for-profit hospitals to provide discounts to uninsured patients.

The 2012 amendments to the Illinois Hospital Uninsured Patient Discount Act mandate that hospitals provide patient discounts that take into account hospital type and family income once an application for a discount is made. 210 ILCS 89/10. The law requires that hospitals provide:
Charitable discount of 100 percent of charges for medically necessary health care services exceeding $300 for uninsured patients with family incomes of not more than 125 percent of the federal poverty level. Note: This applies to rural and critical access hospitals. 210 ILCS 89/10, (a)(4).

Charitable discount of 100 percent of charges for medically necessary health care services exceeding $300 for uninsured patients with family incomes of not more than 200 percent of the federal poverty level. Note: This applies to hospitals other than rural and critical access hospitals. 210 ILCS 89/10, (a)(2).

Discount from charges for medically necessary health care services exceeding $300 to any uninsured patient with a family income of not more than 300 percent of the federal poverty level. Note: This applies to rural and critical access hospitals. 210 ILCS 89/10, (a)(3)(2012).

Discount from charges for medically necessary health care services exceeding $300 to any uninsured patient with a family income of not more than 600 percent of the federal poverty level. Note: This applies to hospitals other than rural and critical access hospitals. 210 ILCS 89/10, (a)(1) (2012).

The 2012 amendment to the Fair Patient Billing Act (S.B. 3261, codified as 210 ILCS 88/27) also directed the Office of the Attorney General to develop rules requiring hospitals to include specifically prescribed language in financial assistance applications. The final rules require, among other things, that financial assistance applications include an opening statement advising applicants that they may be eligible for free or discounted care and that they are not required to provide a Social Security number. A required certification at the end of financial assistance applications must include the text that the rule prescribes, and none other. 77 Ill. Admin. Code §4500.30(a), (h) (2013); (38 Ill. Reg. 12673) (June 20, 2014).

The statute also required the Attorney General to promulgate rules setting forth appropriate methodologies for determining “presumptive eligibility” under which patients would be deemed “eligible for hospital financial assistance without further scrutiny.” S.B. 3261, codified as 210 ILCS 88/27 (2012). Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77 §4500.40(a) (2013). Under those rules, patients in rural or critical access hospitals will be deemed presumptively eligible if they are homeless, deceased with no estate, mentally incapacitated, or Medicaid eligible—but not on the date of service or for a non-covered service. Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77 §4500.40(b);(d) (2013). In addition to the above criteria, patients in hospitals that are not rural or critical access hospitals will also be presumptively eligible if enrolled in a public assistance program for individuals below 200 percent of the federal poverty level such as the Women, Infants and Children Nutrition Program, and the Supplemental Nutrition Program. Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77 §4500.40(b) (2013). A hospital may include additional presumptive eligibility criteria, provided it expands a patient’s presumptive eligibility. Ill. Admin. Code tit. 77 §4500.40(c);(e)(2013).